Tuakau’s very own WOW finalist

David Kirkpatrick from Tuakau, with his 3D printer setup and mannequin. Photo: supplied

David Kirkpatrick, a 34 year old from Tuakau, is a finalist for the 2018 World of Wearable Art (WOW) Show.

He is among finalists from 17 countries selected for the show which will be returning for its thirtieth year from 27 September to 14 October in Wellington. David said, “This means a lot to me after all the hard work and late nights. I hope that my story and design inspires others.”

David’s piece is an aviation inspired bra that was created over a six month period. The construction is mainly 3D printed plastic with a fibreglass reinforcement skin and lots of paint. “For me as an engineer the highlight is turning a concept you have designed into reality,” said David. “Taking an image from your head and turning it into reality to share it with others is a special thing. I can’t give away too much detail but I do enjoy the moving elements of the bra!”

The piece was made at David’s home in the spare room where his 3D printer is. It later expanded to take up the whole garage. This is David’s first piece and he didn’t originally set out to enter. “I was inspired two years ago when my wife, Kristy Kirkpatrick, got her piece into the final show.

“At the time of starting I was actually in a rather depressive stage of my life. We had our second newborn who had an allergy and that had taken a toll on us. Generally I didn’t know what to do with myself and was down in the dumps. I started designing and experimenting and this lead to me creating a bra and entering. This really helped me out of a dark place and gave me a purpose and something to look forward to. I hope my story of design and achievement helps others that are struggling to realise there is light at the end of the tunnel.”

David now has a few repairs to complete as suggested by the WOW team, to make the bra more robust before the two further stages of judging. “Probably still a few more late nights before it’s back down for the show!” The 2018 WOW Design Competition offers over $170,000 in prize money but David said the money is not the reason he entered. “If I did win anything I’d probably spend it on my beautiful family.”


 

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