Thanks for the house deposit mum, don’t forget to mow the berm dad!

 

 

This weekend, if you’re heading out to an Open Home and not relying on mum and dad for a hand out to buy the house, then you are a rare breed.

And if you’re out mowing the lawns this Saturday and decide to mow your neighbour’s berm then give yourself a big pat on the back.
You’re a rarity too.
A new nationwide survey has found 62% of Kiwis say it will be difficult to buy a house without financial support from family or friends.
The drive behind the HRV State of Home survey, conducted by independent research company Buzz Channel, was to gain an insight into what issues New Zealanders face when it comes to their homes.
The contentious berm issue has potential to drive neighbour relations awry with more than half of Kiwis either refusing, or being reluctant, to mow their neighbour’s grass verge. However, even though a big majority would either ignore it or begrudgingly do it, a third of Kiwis say they would happily do their neighbour’s berm, with retirees and those aged between 55-74 most likely to oblige.
Some key findings from the survey were;
• 62% believe it will be difficult to buy a house without financial help from family or friends.
• 44% believe their parents are now expected to help their children buy their first home
• 86% of Kiwis aged between 18-34 years old have a goal to own their own home
• Having insulation, double glazing, heat pump and ventilation is more important to people than a good school zone.
• More than half of Kiwis would either refuse, or be reluctant, to mow their neighbour’s grass verge.
• 1 in 4 people have called noise control on their neighbours.
• 26% of New Zealanders have moved out of a house because it was cold, damp and mouldy, up from 20% in 2014.

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