Substantial manufacturing and warehousing plant

One of the biggest industrialmanufacturing and warehousing complexes in the SouthAuckland suburb of Papakura has been placed on the marketfor sale.

The 6,302 square metre industrial and warehousing plant at 80C Hunua Road houses the administration offices and distribution space of leading New Zealand plastic products manufacturing and sales company Interworld Plastics 2013 Limited.

Interworld Plastics specialises in the plastic container and storage solutions business. Its products include kitchen/laundry/gardening and general domestic-use storage containers and pots, disposable cutlery for both domestic and commercial food service use,and providing the horticultural sector with a multitude of plastic planter tubes, punnets and pots.

The New Zealand-owned company designs, manufactures, markets, and distributes its range of injection-moulded products for not only the New Zealand, market but also exporting product to Australia and the Pacific Islands.

Interworld Plastics is currently on six-year lease at 80C Hunua Road expiring in 2019, with two further three-year rights of renewal, and generating an annual net rental of $360,000 + GST.

The substantial warehousing and office plant sit on 9,441 square metres of heavy industry zoned freehold land which is being marketed for sale at auction on October 25 through Bayleys Manukau. Salesperson Shane Snijder said properties of this size were hard to find in Papakura.

“The building was erected in the 1980s and has been extended over the ensuing decades to add more storage capacity. There are almost 400 metres of office space and staff amenities such as toilets,lunchroom and locker facilities,” Mr Snijdersaid.

“The main warehouse and workshop stud heights rantfrom 6.15 metres to 6.5 metres high, while the westernaddition of the building has a stud height of 3.5 metres.

“Within the factory are two small mezzanine areas, andadjoining at the back corner is a 4.8 metre high workshop.As a result of the various stud heights, the premises isdivided internally into the office area and six main factoryparts.

“The current format of the building has been specifically designed for Interworld Plastics, and as a result the supporting columns are positioned to maximise efficient stock control and placement by moving equipment,” Mr Snijder added.

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