Pukekohe’s Selwyn Centre celebrates 10 years

Pukekohe’s Selwyn Centre coordinator Libby Daveyand Sally Naulls, who coordinated all Selwyn Centres onbehalf of the Selwyn Foundation cut the birthday cake.

Pukekohe’s Selwyn Centre coordinator Libby Daveyand Sally Naulls, who coordinated all Selwyn Centres onbehalf of the Selwyn Foundation cut the birthday cake.

Pukekohe’s Selwyn Centre, based at the Anglican Church, has been entertaining and supporting elderly folk around the town for ten years and that fact was celebrated abundantly last week with speeches, morning tea, a sing-along and a lunch.
Sally Naulls from the Selwyn Foundation introduced the concept of the Selwyn Centre to Pukekohe shortly after Jan Wallace became vicar of Pukekohe’s Anglican church. Libby Davey, the Selwyn Centre coordinator, and several of her volunteers have been involved with the Centre from day one. The philosophy behind the Selwyn Centre is to help elderly folk maintain their independence and to promote early intervention in case of health or mobility issues.
The centre gives participants friendship, and a reason to get up and meet other people. Sessions include some gentle exercise to aid mobility, morning tea – so there is time for a natter, board games and on Tuesday those that want to can take part in a shared lunch for $5.
The Tuesday group is the largest with 20-25 people showing up and the Thursday one has an average of 12 attendees. Paul Brown, PCA chair, and Mark Ball, on behalf of Counties Manukau DHB, which helps fund the Pukekohe Selwyn Centre spoke briefly at the meeting. Keyboardist for the music session was Waiuku man Rod McGregor.
For more information contact: 238 0561/021 033 9047. Selwyn Centres are also available elsewhere in Franklin. Papakura (includes respite care), ph: 297 2252, Tuakau (includes respite care), ph: 233 4303 / 021 555 002 and Waiuku, ph: 225 2238 / 022 359 954.

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