Pukekohe Christian School crowned Bridge Building Champions

Pukekohe Christian School students Jack Wicks, Jason Kelsey and Hamish Cossey constructed the winningbridge that withstood an outstanding load of 78.1kg on competition day.

Pukekohe Christian School students Jack Wicks, Jason Kelsey and Hamish Cossey constructed the winningbridge that withstood an outstanding load of 78.1kg on competition day.

Pukekohe Christian School was crowned New Zealand’s bridge building champion at Aurecon’s Bridge Building Competition recently.
Aurecon runs the annual school bridge building competition involving year eight and nine students in Australia and year nine and ten students in New Zealand, to raise awareness of the engineering profession among students .
Students Hamish, Jack and Jason constructed the winning bridge that withstood an outstanding load of 78.1kg on competition day.
The trio were motivated to get involved in the competition through a shared curiosity for engineering and the opportunity to explore the industry as a possible career path.
“Competition day was a lot of fun. It was really interesting to see how all the different structures behaved and how much effort it took to break them,” commented the team.
“There’s a lot of thinking and experimentation that goes into bridge building so it’s very exciting to see that all of our hard work paid off, and was rewarded with a win.”
The national title winning bridges were two of hundreds of bridges designed and constructed by high school students across Australia and New Zealand.
Judges were wowed by the extremely high level of ingenuity and creativity brought to the competitions.
Bill Cox, Aurecon’s Managing Director, Australia and New Zealand commented that “It’s an honour and a real pleasure to observe how clever young minds engage with science, technology, engineering and mathematics in such a challenging and stimulating learning environment.”

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