Next stage of work at safe speed camera site on Waiuku Road

Work is progressing on the installation of a new safe speed camera in a high crash risk area in the Counties Manukau Police District.

Waiuku Road in Mauku is among 33 sites across the country where new safe speed cameras will be placed in an effort to drive down mean speeds and related deaths and injuries in these areas.

“The placement of the poles and cameras is occurring at those sites across the country that have been identified as having a high crash risk and a history of fatalities and injury crashes, based on detailed analysis by independent traffic experts” says Operations Manager Road Policing, Inspector Peter McKennie.

Work to install the first poles that will eventually hold the cameras began in early September, and the pole for the Waiuku Road site will be put in place in the near future.

The cameras will be installed after that and once in place, they will be thoroughly tested before becoming operational, says Mr McKennie.

“We know from international experience that safe speed cameras do have an impact on slowing people down, particularly around the sphere of influence of the camera.

“This is why we are working to place safe speed cameras at this and other sites, to encourage people to reduce their mean speeds, which, when coupled with road safety improvements and other measures, helps to reduce deaths and injuries” Mr McKennie says.

Site works for the 33 sites were announced in May this year, and represent the third phase of the $10m static camera expansion programme announced in July 2013.

Mr McKennie says Police isn’t interested in camera fines.

“We’re only interested in the impact the cameras have in encouraging people to slow down to safe and appropriate speeds and get to their destination safely.

“This will also continue to be backed by other measures, such as maintaining a highly visible Police presence on high risk routes and other enforcement tools.

“It’s quite simple: if people drive at an appropriate and safe speed for the road and the conditions, they’ll be in no danger of getting a ticket – or, more importantly, being involved in a crash” Mr McKennie says.

 

Waiuku Rd,
photo: Google Earth

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