New advertising campaign challenges the ‘right’ to speed

A new road safety advertising campaign is directly challenging speeding drivers to slow down and stop defending their perceived ‘right’ to speed.

The joint NZ Transport Agency/Police campaign addresses the significant proportion of the driving population who still like to travel at speeds which are too fast for the conditions, on the open road and around town, posing a risk to themselves and to others who share the roads with them.

“Every week, 11 people are seriously injured or killed in a speed-related crash on New Zealand roads, but a substantial portion of our society does not see the connection between speed and crashes,” says NZ Transport Agency Director of Safety and Environment Harry Wilson.

“That needs to change, because the facts and the physics are indisputable.

Speed is always a crucial factor in determining the severity of the crash and the severity of the injuries to the people involved.

The simple and inescapable truth is that less speed means less harm in a crash.”

Assistant Commissioner for Road Policing Sandra Venables says the consequences of people driving too fast for the conditions can be devastating.

“Police officers see the human cost of speed nearly every day on our roads.

Crashes occur due to a wide range of mistakes, whether involuntary or deliberate, but the outcome is vastly different at different speeds.

“Even when speed doesn’t cause the crash, it is the single biggest determinant in whether anyone is killed, injured, or walks away unharmed.

A small change in speed makes a big difference to injury severity.

“Our plea to all drivers this year is to be courteous and slow down, to make sure you get to your destination safely.”

The campaign

The campaign launched on 7 January 2018 on television, video-on-demand and on YouTube.

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