Monthly road crash statistics update – August 2017

The data presented here are provisional. Crash data as at 8th September 2017.

  • Twenty-nine people died on New Zealand roads in August. This is 2 fewer than August 2016 and is 5 more than the average August road toll for the last five years.Graph showing August deaths
  • To the end of August this year, 253 people have died on New Zealand roads. This is 35 more than at the same time last year.
  • In the 12 months to the end of August 2017, 363 people died on our roads. This is 35 more than the 12 months to the end of August 2016.
  • During August, 20 of the deaths were car or van drivers, 4 were car or van passengers, 3 were motorcyclists and 2 were cyclists.
  • Seventeen of the 29 deaths were in open road crashes. Seventeen were in single vehicle crashes in which a driver lost control of the vehicle or ran off the road and 7 were in head-on collisions.
  • Five of the 29 deaths were in collisions involving a truck.
  • Of the 24 vehicle occupants who died, 12 were not restrained at the time of the crash.

Deaths and Police reported injuries by age, sex and type of road user

Deaths are for the 12 months to the end of August 2017. Reported injuries are for the 12 months to the end of March 2017.

Note: Preliminary fatal crash reports are submitted within 24 hours of a crash related death. Full injury crash reports are submitted only after the crash investigations are completed, so there is a lag in the reporting of injury crashes.

Road user type by sex

Sex Drivers Passengers Motorcyclists Pedestrians Cyclists Other Total
Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries
Male 153 4005 46 1177 46 1036 23 460 11 540 2 43 281 7261
Female 41 3239 25 1671 1 215 14 383 1 170 0 22 82 5700
Total 194 7244 71 2848 47 1251 37 843 12 710 2 65 363 12961
%male 79% 55% 65% 41% 98% 83% 62% 55% 92% 76% 100% 66% 77% 56%

Road user type by age group

Age group Drivers Passengers Motorcyclists Pedestrians Cyclists Other Total
Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries Deaths Injuries
Under-15 2 23 9 500 1 18 2 162 0 85 0 25 14 813
15-24 47 2008 29 1015 5 327 5 166 1 118 1 6 88 3640
25-34 35 1567 16 440 8 214 7 111 2 89 0 1 68 2422
35-44 24 1020 2 187 10 175 1 94 1 122 0 3 38 1601
45-54 22 961 7 209 11 283 8 78 3 131 0 4 51 1666
55-64 25 780 4 172 9 170 2 88 1 95 0 4 41 1309
65-74 17 460 3 128 3 43 3 60 4 39 1 2 31 732
75+ 21 396 1 83 0 8 9 62 0 6 0 20 31 575
Unknown 1 29 0 114 0 13 0 22 0 25 0 0 1 203
Total 194 7244 71 2848 47 1251 37 843 12 710 2 65 363 12961

Graph showing deaths and injuries by age group Graph showing types of road users killed and injured

 Trends

Graph showing casualties and vehicle fleet compared to 1990Since 1990 the number of vehicles on the road has increased by 78 percent while Police reported injuries have dropped by 22 percent, road deaths have dropped by 52 percent and the number of days spent in hospital as a result of road crashes has dropped by 54 percent.

Crash outcomes and road user behaviour

 Road crash data

Deaths  2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Number of road deaths 405 393 421 366 384 375 284 308 253 293 319 328 363
Deaths per 10,000 vehicles 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.88 0.95 0.77 0.86 0.91 0.90 0.95
Deaths per 100,000 people 9.9 9.5 10.0 8.6 8.9 8.6 6.4 6.9 5.7 6.5 6.9 7.0 7.6

Note: Road deaths for 2017 are for the 12 months to the end of August 2017.

Injuries  2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Reported injuries 14456 15174 16013 15317 14625 14031 12574 12122 11781 11219 12270 12247 12961
Number hospitalised (all discharges) 7210 7680 7440 7570 7590 7360 6780 7070 7150 6940 7310 8010 8152
Number hospitalised for over 1 day 3198 3396 3404 3244 3042 2909 2707 2794 2886 2716 2902 3053 3075
Number hospitalised for over 3 days 2192 2251 2351 2210 2051 1918 1801 1872 1886 1752 1905 1992 2012

Note: Reported injuries for 2017 are for the 12 months to the end of March 2017.
Hospitalisations for 2017 are for the 12 months to the end of March 2017.

Behavioural measures

Speed              2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Rural speed, % over 100 km/h 36% 32% 29% 30% 29% 29% 31% 25% 25% 22% 23% n/a
Rural speed, mean (km/h) 97.1 96.4 96.3 96.6 96.3 96.2 96.5 95.6 95.7 95.3 95.7 n/a
Rural speed, 85th percentile (km/h) 104 103 103 103 103 103 103 102 102 101 101 n/a
Alcohol                         2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Number of drivers killed with excess alcohol 58 54 65 59 66 68 48 49 38 31 51 50
Percent of drivers killed with excess alcohol 25% 24% 27% 28% 28% 30% 26% 27% 23% 18% 25% 23%
Occupant Restraints 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Seat belts worn by adults, front 95% 95% 95% 95% 95% 96% 96% 96% n/a 97% n/a 97%
Seat belts worn by adults, rear 86% 89% 87% 87% 87% 88% 90% n/a n/a 92% n/a n/a
Child restraints used, 0-4 years 89% 91% 91% 90% 91% 93% n/a 92% n/a  93% n/a 93%
Cycle helmets        2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Cycle helmets worn, weekday 91% 94% 92% 92% 92% 93% 93% 92% n/a n/a 94% n/a

 Factors contributing to crashes – ranked by social cost*

Graph showing factors contributing to crashesNotes:

Crash data for the 12 months to the end of March 2017.
Since there can be several contributing factors for a single crash the figures represented in this graph add to more than 100%.

Alcohol data is not comparable to earlier years due to changes in the crash reporting process.

* Social cost calculations include loss of life or life quality, loss of output due to injuries, medical and rehabilitation costs, legal and court costs and property damage.

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