In response to the fatal accidents on Counties Manukau Roads;

 

 

Have your SayIn the first few months of my police days in Pukekohe (circa 1976), I attended and dealt with five fatal accidents (all these years later I still have vivid flashbacks).
Most of which were alcohol related, when it was a socially accepted practice, and all were on country roads.
In the intervening years much has changed both positive and negative, however I’m picking that most of the current crop of fatal’s are on rural roads with an open speed limit of 100km, but are totally unsuited to this limit. Am I right or am I right? Social media comments would confirm this.
Without doubt this makes the Police jobs most difficult to say the least; our short stretch of rural road just out of Pukekohe Township illustrates this point perfectly. The unfortunate stressed commuters frustrated by the congested motorway (LOL motorway?) hits this road (Cape Hill Road, Rural) believing that as the limit is100km it’s safe at100km with disastrous consequences, the road safe speed is probably more like 70kms. There have been at least 39 go off the road since January 2015, usually car vs fence in just 2km of road. Of course this type of accident is not limited to only our road but is replicated in many places.
Now the point is ‘Where are the Police?’
Probably on Stadium Drive, nicely tucked into the dip and clocking speeders at just over the limit.
So what to do? Don’t know? It’s a frustrating situation admittedly as these roads should have a limit of 70kms for sure. A remedy must be found sooner rather than later before more of these car vs fence accidents turns into fatals!
Roger Vincent. Letter abridged.
Editor’s Note – We have been in contact with Counties Manukau Police with regards to the above letter.
The Police are set with speed limits and rules for New Zealand roads, and it is their job to enforce them. Counties Manukau Police have advised that this is an Auckland Transport issue, who are yet to comment on the subject of speed limits and rural roads.

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