Harry’s amazing stats recognised

 

 

By Duane Ranger
Harinder Singh Dhindsa’s 2016-2017 season stats are hardly cricket, in fact they border on ridiculousness.The man they call ‘Harry” amassed more than 1,000 runs in just 16 innings for his Pukekohe Metro Cricket Club in the Counties-Manukau Cricket Association’s Senior-B competition just gone.
Modest as ever, the 25-year-old said he loved the game from his childhood days back in India, and thanked God for his freakish talent.
Born in Punjab, Harry has just completed his second season with the Pukekohe Club.
He batted 16 times and amassed 1043 runs at an average of 104.3. His strike-rate was a whopping 152.43.
Harry scored four centuries and five 50s in 2016-2017. His highest score of 223 not out came against Karaka on his home ground (Bledisloe Park) in February.
His amazing season comprised 131 fours and 34 sixes. He also took nine catches and was the team’s second highest wicket taker with 31 dismissals.
He was obviously named Pukekohe Metro’s ‘Player-of-the-Season. That was just one of nine trophies he was awarded with at the Club’s annual prize-giving ceremony in April.

Harry’s nine trophies were: MVP Club Player, Best Batting Average, Best Batting All-RounderBest Batting Average and AggregateBest Outstanding Performance (223*), a trophy for each of his three centuries and Double Century.

Last season, Harry also picked up three trophies in his inaugural season with the club.
These are outstanding statistics considering Harry, who always wears the number 13 on his back, plays 45-over cricket each Saturday. So is he heading for the top?
My club wants me to play a higher grade and I want to, but it all depends on my Visa. Once it is approved I will be able to focus more on my cricket, but for now it’s all about work and trying to become a permanent resident here.
I love New Zealand very much and would love to go further with my cricket, but if my Visa isn’t approved I might have to move on. Khalsa Aid is a strong alternative and something I definitely want to do one day,” he said.
Khalsa Aid is an international relief work organisation that assists victims in disaster situations.
All of Harry’s family live in India, but he is adamant on staying in New Zealand where he wants to work, study and play cricket.
My Indian friends here are my family now and they have been so nice to me. People like my cricket team mate Harkit Singh, and Amrit Singh Binning have been wonderful.
Countdown Pukekohe and its staff, especially Sharyn Henderson, have also been very supportive of me and my Visa application. I love it here and really want to make New Zealand my home,” Harry, a devout Sikh said.
Harry played cricket in India but not to the standard he’s playing now. He said there were more opportunities for him in Aotearoa.

Caption: Pukekohe Metro Cricket's Harinder Singh Dhindsa with his haul of trophies from the 2016-17 season.
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