Brigade ‘vital cog’ for 75 years

The Tuakau Volunteer Fire Brigade have reached their 75 year milestone.
On Saturday 6 May, the dedicated group of volunteers celebrated their 75th Jubilee with an open day for the community, which was followed by a dinner for past, current and life members of the brigade at the Tuakau War Memorial Hall.
Appliances from Tuakau, Mercer, Papatoetoe 344, 348 and the Pukekohe V8 all took part in a parade, before being parked for display outside the Tuakau Fire Station, much to the community’s delight.
The station was open for the public to go through, which had a range of memorabilia on display.
While having the trucks on display were popular for the children, the public swarmed around the jaws of life demonstration.
The Tuakau brigade demonstrated how they would extract a trapped passenger in a motor vehicle crash. The car, which was donated by Curley’s Salvage, had its roof completely removed, and the ‘patient’, brigade member, Craig Cowley, was removed.
“It was great to have the local support, and for the community to come down and see what we do. Some were really in awe of the demonstrations,” says brigade member, Will O’Connell.
At the evening function, 26 active and life members were presented with medals and plaques for their service and dedication.
Waikato District Mayor, Allan Sanson, and wife, Trisha, were also in attendance at the 75th Jubilee.
“It is a well-known saying that a strong volunteer organisation is a sign of a strong Community. The Tuakau Volunteer Fire Brigade is one of those and has been a vital cog in the strong Tuakau community for an impressive 75 years,” said Mayor Sanson.
“The men and women of the Brigade are passionate about giving back to their community and are passionate about protecting those that live and work within it.  In the last year the Brigade has attended 280 call outs with more than half of those due to motor vehicle incidents but also attending emergency CPR to assist St John staff. I want to congratulate them on their milestone of reaching 75 years.”

 

Since you’re here… we have a small favour to ask. More and more people want the Post than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So you can see why we need to ask for your help. The Post’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. With investigative reporting, we often don't know at the beginning how a story will unfold and how long it might take to uncover. This can mean it is costly – particularly as we often face legal threats that attempt to stop our reporting. But we remain committed to raising important questions and exposing wrongdoing. And we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too. If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps to support it, our future would be much more secure. For as little as NZ$5, you can support the Post – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Support The Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *